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#JCREWNYFW: The Men’s 2017-ish Collection


What will you be wearing next spring? The J.Crew men’s design team provided a few clues on Sunday, September 11th, with 28 looks that ran the gamut, from a patchwork chino trouser to a vintage-inspired madras jacket. For those peacocks who enjoy wearing pink or seersucker, there will also be plenty of items to put in your cart. The show was a reinvention of heritage and iconic pieces, and “because we feel personal style is so important to who we are as a brand, we chose a different approach with the models for this show,” said Jenna. “They are friends of the brand, members of our team and all people we admire.”


THE INSPIRATION

Before the show, our head menswear designer Frank sketches the looks.

And the finished Wallace & Barnes workwear jacket.


“This season we stayed close to home by looking at classic J.Crew pieces but from a new perspective. Traditional fabrics were mixed with fresh silhouettes. We played with colors…several shades of chinos, several different blues—in the same outfit. Mike Disfarmer’s photos of everyday people in rural Arkansas, the studio of painter Brice Marden, the bohemian Dream Away Lodge and an image of Neal Cassady with Jack Kerouac are all from the past, but they inspired us to capture an easy American way of dressing, which feels incredibly modern.”
Frank

BEHIND THE SCENES

(Clockwise) Terrance A., a yoga teacher relaxes in a Ludlow cotton-metal dinner jacket. A detail of a madras jacket.  The team takes their places: Lillian D., crewcuts designer and disco enthusiast; Esmé T., student and amateur tennis player; Darrick H., group photo director, Redbook and Woman's Day; Dashiel Tao H., eighth grader; Mari M., humanitarian, model and DJ.


Box Fresh: Some of our retro-cool sneakers from Adidas, Vans, Nike and New Balance


Donte´ C., a personal stylist and bespoke tailor, wears a Ludlow fielding suit in black and blue seersucker.

Chef Lee M. jokes with clean energy entrepreneur Tim K., who is wearing the Wallace & Barnes French workwear jacket.


“Not everything is perfectly manicured,” noted Frank of the looks which were meant to feel “less military, more surplus.”


Crewcuts design team member Jordan J. wears a slouchy walking coat over a MA-1 bomber jacket. 

A detail from a patched chino.


The show included 37 women’s looks and 28 men’s.


Pre-game (from left): Willy M., a Crewcuts designer, wears seersucker and a Lighthouse critter slouchy sweatshirt.  Sinclair A., an intern, in a pink sweatshirt;  Lee M., a chef, in madras, and Logan L., a woman’s designer, wears a patchwork overdyed madras chore jacket.  


Stephen J., our Wallace & Barnes merchant, wears an ivy-colored trench, a lightweight combat jacket and a vintage Japanese chino.

A big idea was using khaki in a mismatched way and with different tones.


What happens when crewcuts models grow up? They come back.

Taylor C., a sailor and bartender, wears a pale sage MA-1 bomber jacket as he reads backstage.


“We looked at the fabrics we’ve been using all along but put them in a new light.” —Frank


Richard M., a photographer, wears our English bus driver jacket.

Chuck M., a photographer and dad, in a Wallace & Barnes French workwear jacket with a button-down pique polo.


“We chose three ideas to expand on: chinos, stripes and the color pink. We then looked at them through the lens of all our customers—the preppy ones, the tomboys, the girly girls, the workwear guys, the traditionalists, the peacocks…”
Jenna     



Photographs by Kevin Tachman.

Listen to the playlist from our NYFW presentation on our Spotify channel here

Also, follow us on Instagram and Twitter and search #jcrewnyfw for behind-the-scenes pictures and more of our show.
TAGS: nyfw, inspiration, mens, frank mutyjens, wallace & barnes
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