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TRAVEL NOTES:
AMSTERDAM

We headed to Amsterdam for our October Style Guide shoot, where we ate the best Gouda of our lives, rode lots of bikes and made some new friends along
the way…


“It was light out from 5am to 10pm, so we managed to squeeze in a lot: multiple cheese tastings, trips to windmills, a boat ride on the canals...”
Tara, production director 


OUTTAKES FROM OUR STYLE GUIDE
Clement and Queeny cruise around Amsterdam’s 60 miles of canals in a traditional wooden sloep (pronounced slope).

Working windmills in the nearby town of Schermerhorn. We met the man who lives in one of them and found out he was actually born there too. (Yes, inside the windmill.) 

It’s hard to say which looks the best here—the bike, the architecture, the clothes or Clement. We’ll call it a four-way tie. 

Our model Queeny is actually from Amsterdam. Her mom even dropped by for a visit! 

Yup, more bikes.

One of Amsterdam’s many (many) bike lanes. We accidentally wandered into one—good thing Queeny was there to translate all the curses people yelled at us.

Did we mention they’re really into biking?



“Amsterdam was so inspiring—the history, the people, all of it. We even ended up naming a color in this collection ‘Dutch sky.’”
Mark, art director

BEHIND-THE-SCENES INSTAGRAMS




SPOTLIGHT ON WHERE TO SHOP & WHERE TO EAT

 Olaf Hussein is a young Dutch menswear designer who just opened his first store in Amsterdam’s Nine Streets neighborhood. 
The mid-century interiors echo Hussein’s 1950s-inspired collection. OLAF HUSSEIN, Prinsengracht 491C
LEFT:  Olaf Hussein is a young Dutch menswear designer who just opened his first store in Amsterdam’s Nine Streets neighborhood. 
RIGHT: The mid-century interiors echo Hussein’s 1950s-inspired collection. OLAF HUSSEIN, Prinsengracht 491C

Michelin-starred chef Gert-Jan Hageman of  De Kas, which is located in a greenhouse dating back
to 1926.
 The restaurant, where the menu changes daily based on which produce (grown on-site) is freshest. DE KASKamerlingh Onneslaan 3
LEFT: Michelin-starred chef Gert-Jan Hageman of  De Kas, which is located in a greenhouse dating back
to 1926.
RIGHT:  The restaurant, where the menu changes daily based on which produce (grown on-site) is freshest. DE KASKamerlingh Onneslaan 3




MORE TIPS FROM TRAVEL WRITER EIMEAR LYNCH…

HOW TO GET THERE

Fly into Amsterdam Airport Schiphol and jump on a train to Amsterdam Centraal Station. About 15 minutes and 4.20 euros later (approximately $4.75) and you’ll be in the center of Amsterdam.

TO STAY

Andaz Amsterdam 

Prinsengracht 587, De 9 Straatjes 
A former public library on the Prince’s Canal (or Prinsengracht). Three-foot bell-shaped lamps light the reception, and bright yellow oversized egg chairs face floor-to-ceiling windows for views of the canal.

The Hoxton

Herengracht 255, De 9 Straatjes
An offshoot of the original Hoxton
in East London, this bright, loft-like hotel feels like a tasteful friend’s apartment—and indeed, it was originally a row of five historic canal-front homes.

TO SHOP

Gerda’s Flowers

Runstraat 16, De 9 Straatjes 
This flower shop looks just like a film set, with bikes resting against pots of hydrangeas and peonies blooming out front. Look out for the beautiful handblown glass vases.

MENDO

Berenstraat 11, De 9 Straatjes
MENDO bills itself as “a candy store for book aficionados.” And the minimalist shop within the Nine Streets shopping district does feel like a treat, with colorful art and photography books artfully stacked on black shelves
and tables.

SHOP/SHOP

Ruysdaelkade 2-4
This store inside the new Arita House museum stocks porcelain made
in Arita, Japan, one of the world’s ceramic capitals. The range of styles is impressive, from paper-thin pastel tableware to neon-colored tea towels.

FOR A CULTURE FIX

Rijksmuseum

Museumstraat 1, Museumplein
This stately museum is dedicated to Dutch art and history from the Middle Ages through today. There are more than a million objects in its collection, but the real reasons to go are 2,000 paintings from the Dutch Golden Age by the likes of Vermeer and Rembrandt.

Arita House

Ruysdaelkade 2-4
This new museum, housed in a 1920s building, is devoted to Japanese and Dutch crafts (particularly delicate porcelain) and is curated by designers Teruhiro Yanagihara and Scholten & Baijings.

Vondelpark

Oud-Zuid
Amsterdam’s answer to Central Park, Vondelpark is where everyone bikes and tucks into picnics on weekends. Stroll around its tree-fringed ponds after a trip to the nearby Museum Quarter.

Van Gogh Museum

Museumplein 6, Museumplein
Home to 200 Van Gogh paintings, along with 400 drawings and 700 letters, this museum tells the artist’s story—and shows how every stage of his life played out in the dreamy artworks on view.

EYE Film Institute

IJpromenade 1, 1031 
North Amsterdam is a quickly changing neighborhood where in-the-know locals hang out. Fittingly, it’s home to the EYE Film Institute, an architectural, aerodynamic-looking building that puts on film-centric exhibitions and screens movies from morning to night.

FOR A DETOUR

Museummolen Schermerhorn

Noordervaart 2, 1636 VL Schermerhorn
A 40-minute drive from Amsterdam’s city center, this historic windmill has a glass floor that allows for a closer look at how it works.

TO EAT AND DRINK

Café-Restaurant de Plantage 

Plantage Kerklaan 36 
In an 1800s-era orangery, this bistro is known for its bright, elegant dining room and flavorful Mediterranean menu. The squid risotto, Basque fish soup and wild boar ravioli are standouts. 

Restaurant As

Pr. Irenestraat 19
A protégé of Alice Waters opened this restaurant on an organic farm. The food, like the vibe, is homey and comforting. Start with ricotta-topped flatbreads, then go for the roast chicken with mashed potatoes and grilled vegetables.

Pluk Amsterdam

Reestraat 19
It’s hard to imagine a prettier café than this whitewashed slip of space with a lofted eating area. Fresh juices, salads, pastries and cakes offer a (mostly) healthy respite from Amsterdam’s ubiquitous cheeses and stews.




Eimear is a former New Yorker living in London. Her work has appeared in T Magazine, Condé Nast Traveler and Bon Appétit

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TAGS: style guide, mens, womens, crewcuts, travel notes
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