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The New Rules: The Wedding Weekend


A foolproof guide to dressing from Friday night’s rehearsal dinner to Sunday morning’s bleary-eyed brunch.

Meet Ajay, a Tribeca pediatrician, and Sam, a magazine editor and green tea enthusiast.


Lately, we’ve noticed more and more couples playing fast and loose with wedding traditions. They’re skipping hotel ballrooms and matching cummerbunds and inviting friends and family to barns, beaches and industrial spaces (like The Foundry, an industrial event venue in Long Island City, Queens, shown here). The good news is that means you get more leeway in what to wear. A good rule of thumb: If the happy couple can skip the receiving line, then you can skip the tie. Here’s how to dress for your most creative,
well-meaning friends.

REHEARSAL DINNER: SMART CASUAL

Meeting the bride’s Aunt Helen requires looking pulled together, but not as dressed up as you’ll be for the wedding itself. An unstructured blazer looks classic with a polo and penny loafers or more laid-back with a short-sleeve shirt and sneakers. Either way, the message is you’re here to celebrate, and you’re just getting started.


RULE 1: YOU CAN WEAR SHORT SLEEVES

There’s no law that says you need long sleeves, and there’s no law that says your blazer has to stay on all night, especially at an outdoor, summertime
wedding party.


RULE 2: POLO + BLAZER = JUST DRESSED UP ENOUGH

A polo looks at ease but still polished—especially when it’s a supersoft Pima cotton
sweater-polo.



CEREMONY & RECEPTION: FESTIVE

With so many different types of venues and dress codes (see a few of our, um, favorites below), there’s one thing you can be sure of: A navy suit always looks good. It gives you options too. Go traditional with a repp tie and lace-up derbys or laid-back with an open collar.

RULE 3: TIES ARE OPTIONAL

You can forgo the tie at a laid-back wedding, but you still need a little something to liven things up, like a chambray boutonniere or a silk pocket square.


RULE 4: NO SOCKS REQUIRED

It can get hot on the dance floor, and this gives you a little air conditioning. Likewise, sneakers can come in handy when the DJ plays your favorite ’80s anthem. (Just keep them clean and
simple—nothing you’d wear to the gym.)



RECOVERY BRUNCH: GETAWAY CASUAL

Saying goodbye before heading home is about comfort: shorts, sneakers and aspirin (we’re not judging).

The Wedding Invitation Decoder


When the happy couple gets creative with their dress code, here’s how to read between the letterpress-printed lines.

Festive
Consider this a license to take some liberties: a bolder suit, a patterned shirt or sneakers. (Just not all three.)

Creative Cocktail
Let the amateurs get out their “party
shirts” while you go classic on top and
comfortable down below: a navy suit, a white or blue shirt, a dark tie
and sneakers.

Garden Party
Choose (one) from the official fabrics of summer (seersucker, madras, linen). If you wear a bow tie once a year, this
is the day.

Farmhouse Chic/Backyard Formal
Consider some restraint: a lighter suit with a more casual shirt (gingham, chambray). Knit tie optional.

Beach Formal
A jacket and pants, but think lighter colors and lightweight fabrics (cotton, linen, madras) and no tie. Yes: loafers, sneakers, espadrilles. No: exposed toes.

Note: If the invite says “black tie,” check out our Tuxedo Shop, where the cost of about four rentals will get you a suit no one else has worn to be the engine of the conga line.

Visit the Tuxedo Shop here.
Special thanks to The Foundry.

Photographs by Tommy Ton.
Grooming by Troi Ollivierre.


Visit the Suit Shop here.

Shop our men’s collection here.
TAGS: mens, weddings, suits, tuxedos
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