Looks like you're using an older browser. For the best experience possible, please upgrade your browser or download a modern browser.
We recommend either of these free browsers: Firefox or Chrome
You must update your Flash version to view videos. http://www.adobe.com/go/getflashplayer

Studio Tour: Emma Smith

London-based artist and self-proclaimed animal lover Emma Smith is responsible for the honeybee illustrations on our collection of tees for Buglife, a charity that supports the conservation of bees and other endangered bugs. We stopped by Emma’s studio in East London to talk flora, fauna and how we can all help save the bees.



ANIMAL INSTINCTS
Emma has always had a love for the natural world. “I’m fascinated with animals and flowers. I grew up in the countryside, surrounded by fields, trees and rivers,” she says. Now as a London girl, she still finds inspiration in her new urban home—from afternoons at local parks and gardens to visits to the natural history museum and trips to thrift shops for botanical books. “I spend a lot of time outside walking. I love watching birds and insects going about their business while I go about mine.”

“The Save the Bees initiative is something everyone can be involved in. You can make small steps just by planting seeds or having window boxes.”

PEN & INK
When working on her honeybee rendering for us, Emma pored over photographs and diagrams of bees to get a feel for their highly intricate structure. “I want my work to be as accurate as possible. Getting the balance right between the weight of the body and the delicate wings was important,” she says. A traditionalist, Emma draws all her illustrations with an antique mother-of-pearl dipping pen and Indian ink on heavyweight cold-pressed watercolor paper. “The ink glides on beautifully and dries in seconds. As long as I have my nib and ink, I can do it anywhere, it’s just so versatile.” 



GO LOCAL
Emma’s designs can be found at our Sloane Square store, where honey sourced from local beehives (featuring labels illustrated by the artist) and seed paper packs to grow your own plants and flowers will also be given out this fall. The vertical garden on the façade of the new London location was created by “urban greening” company Treebox to encourage bee pollination. “The Save the Bees initiative is something everyone can be involved in. You can make small steps just by planting seeds or having window boxes,” says Emma.



Photography by Kasia Bobula.
TAGS: studio tour, emma smith, garments for good, london
BLOG HOME